Advocacy Resources2018-06-27T08:03:58+00:00

Advocacy Resources

Why work with qualified and certified translators and interpreters?

OSTI submitted this document to our Oregon representatives in Washington, DC, in April of 2014. Helen Eby is listed as a member of the editorial team.

ATA submitted this response to the Department of Homeland Security’s Civil Rights and Civil Liberties Language Access Plan on November 14, 2014. It was downloaded from the ATA site on February 15, 2017. Helen Eby is listed as one of the authors on page 42.

The Washington State Interpreters Union published a review of 621,659 interpreters appointments from 2014 to 2016. The results? 0.63% complaint rate that required discipline. 14 interpreters were terminated from the statewide contract and referred to the State’s certifying body for certification. All these interpreters were either state certified or authorized according to Washington State’s standards. 91% fill rate. Check pages 4, 5 and 6 in this report.

The Federal Government considers this important enough that it has a TIP Sheet to help requesters identify certified translators and interpreters.

Having a job description is essential.

All pay rates are attached to well-defined job descriptions, besides having additional specializations, etc. Please refer to these role definitions for interpreters, translators, translator-transcribers, and terminologists, and send them to your clients. They have been endorsed by highly recognized professional associations. Helen Eby is listed as a member of the drafting and editorial team.

What kinds of services do interpreters and translators provide?

US GSA page on Language Services. Here you will find descriptions of the language services the Federal Government (USG) contracts for.

The Foreign Language Services Ordering Guide lists the different services the USG needs. The guide also includes a list of contracts the USG has accepted.

In October 2017, a Response to the Foreign Language Services Ordering Guide, by Helen Eby and Milena Calderari-Waldron, was delivered electronically and in person to stakeholders in Washington, DC. The vast majority of the recommendations in response are based on a comparison between the Guide and the applicable ASTM Standards.

The Federal Government has developed some TIP Sheets regarding work with interpreters. They are written for remote interpreting, but the principles in these sheets can be applied to other types of interactions.

Should interpreters, translators, and their professional associations engage in lobbying activities?